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Mayor Adams visited Forest Hills last week to announce that phase one of the QueensWay project, which would bring 47-acres of linear park to c…

Electeds and community leaders gathered for a press conference last week where Mayor Adams announced funding for the first phase of the Queens…

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Mayor Adams announced a $35 million investment into the first 5-acre phase of a project planned to bring a 47-acre linear park to central and South Queens.

The project, which has been advocated for since 2011, was in competition with the proposed QueensRail, later QueensLink, a transit corridor that would reactivate the old Rockaway Beach Branch.

Mayor Adams today announced a $35 million investment into the first 5-acre phase of a project planned to bring a 47-acre linear park to central and South Queens.

The project, which has been advocated for since 2011, was in competition with the proposed QueensRail, later QueensLink, a transit corridor that would reactivate the old Rockaway Beach Branch.

Community Board 9 met via Zoom on Tuesday following summer break and covered education issues, infrastructure, quality-of-life issues and more.

Councilwoman Lynn Schulman (D-Forest Hills) spoke of the recent news that the mayor is expected to announce the first phase of the QueensWay project soon.

Near the end of 2019, in the wake of an MTA-released study that slapped an $8 billion price tag on a project to resurrect a defunct train line, QueensRail, a nonprofit group dedicated to the plan, quietly gave birth to a new proposal under a new name: QueensLink.

Months later Covid reared its head in the city and siderailed all talk about the rail’s future for over a year. QueensLink stayed mostly dormant.

Assemblyman Phil Goldfeder (D-Rockaway Park) and officials from Queens College on Monday released the results of a study that concluded reactivating the long-abandoned Rockaway Beach Branch would generate about 500,000 subway rides per day but that residents of the Rockaways supported the alternative park plan.

In a June 6 opinion piece for the Queens Chronicle, titled “On 98th Street, we say ‘No way to QueensWay,’” Neil Gianelli shared his opinion of the proposed QueensWay project.

To bolster his (negative) opinion of the project, he cites an 11-year-old study by Professor Noelwah Netusil of Reed College in Portland, Ore. He ignores multiple other studies of trails and urban parks more comparable to the QueensWay, including several in New York, does not make plain Professor Netusil’s findings, and fails to grasp the broader economic development potential of the QueensWay for hundreds of thousands of residents in central Queens, the entire borough and city.