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True to its word, the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey will conduct a thorough review of mass transit options to LaGuardia Airport in the wake of a proposed AirTrain route being shelved at least temporarily by Gov. Hochul.

In a statement issued last week, the PA announced that three recognized transportation experts will lead the review. The group includes Janette Sadik-Khan, who served as New York City’s transportation commissioner from 2007 to 2013 under former Mayor Mike Bloomberg.

Just prior to a well-publicized outdoor press conference on Monday featuring opponents of the LaGuardia AirTrain, Gov. Hochul announced that she directed the Port Authority to examine alternatives that get more people to and from the airport while also getting them out of their cars and onto mass transit.

But many of the participants were just as interested in what Hochul’s statement did not say as what it did.

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday approved the environmental review of the proposed AirTrain project from Willets Point to LaGuardia Airport.

The approval appears to clear the way for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to build the elevated rail line.

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday approved the environmental review of the proposed AirTrain project from Willets Point to LaGuardia Airport.

The approval appears to clear the way for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey to build the elevated rail line.

As Dragon Boaters and fishermen know, Flushing Creek has some of the worst water quality in New York City.

The Long Term Control Plan by the city government must reduce the amount of pollution in the waterways of New York City to meet the goals of the Clean Water Act. The NYC Department of Environmental Protection improvements to aging sewer infrastructure and wastewater treatment plants have greatly improved local water quality in recent decades, but this plan (nyc.gov/html/dep/html/cso_long_term_control_plan/flushing_creek_ltcp.shtml) doesn’t do enough to actually reduce sources of pollution.

New York City has 578 miles of coastline, with much of it in Queens.

And the borough has about as many ways to enjoy water recreation as there are arguments about who in the borough makes the best pizza.