• October 19, 2019
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Queens Chronicle

qboro: Arts, Culture & Living

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The atmosphere is no glass ceiling

Picture an artistic rendering of a woman in space. Did you see a goddess or an astronaut?Curator Julie Wosk gives you both, and more, at the New York Hall of Science in Corona now through Jan. 26 in the exhibit “Imaging Women in the Space Age,” dominated by photography but also including toys in the form of “Astronaut Barbie” dolls and vignette toys depicting the late Margaret Hamilton, who directed the development of Apollo on-board software, and the late NASA executive “Mother of Hubble” Nancy G. Roman.

Miracle Met pens memoir with Chronicle editor
Posted: October 17, 2019

Yesterday marked the 50th anniversary of arguably the greatest sports story of all-time: the day that the 1969 Mets, a team that Las Vegas oddsmakers gave a 100-1 chance of winning the World Series — and frankly many thought the odds should have been higher — at the beginning of the season, did just that as they defeated the Baltimore Orioles, one of the best baseball teams of all time, in five games.

The 2019 season has understandably been one of celebrating and reliving that amazing (yes, there is no way around that adjective) season.

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Bold new Tartuffe is the same old spinmeister
Posted: October 17, 2019

One can only imagine what French playwright Moliere would think upon learning that a woman is playing the title role in one of his most celebrated works, “Tartuffe,” being presented by Titan Theatre Co. at Queens Theatre through Oct. 27.

In fact this production, under the direction of the group’s artistic director, Lenny Banovez, features a cast made up entirely of females.

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Want mo’ momos? There’s an app for that!
Updated: October 17, 2019 - 12:31 pm

A few years ago, Jeff Orlick made frequent trips to a Jackson Heights momo shop — but he wasn’t there just for the popular Himalayan street food. “I thought the girl behind the counter was cute,” Orlick said. “So, I went there as a way to get to know her.”

Although a romance with the momo worker didn’t blossom, Orlick’s admiration for the South Asian dumpling stayed with him. He’s the founder and main organizer of the Jackson Heights Momo Crawl, an annual event that’s brought hundreds of foodies to western Queens to sample the best momos in New York City.

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Folk art exhibit touches a deep emotional chord
Posted: October 10, 2019

The poet Kahlil Gibran said “Work is love made visible.” The quote seems to apply perfectly to “A Piece of Yourself: Gift Giving in Self-Taught Art,” the exhibit now showing at the American Folk Art Museum’s Self-Taught Genius Gallery in Long Island City.

“The museum is dedicated to self-taught artists with no formal education,” curator Steffi Duarte says. The collection spans the mid-18th century to the early 2000s. Ranging from paintings, quilts and handcrafted metal to furniture and carved animals, the works come with back stories often as compelling, sweetly sentimental (and sometimes startling) as the pieces themselves. Whether passed down to family members or exchanged between friends and colleagues, they also reflect the values of labor, keen skill and hard work, intangible and priceless gifts within gifts.

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Thursday 10/10/2019
Only Brando-directed film showing at MoMI
Posted: October 10, 2019

Marlon Brando’s legendary acting career lasted for more than a half-century but he only got behind the camera to direct once.

His 1961 western “One-Eyed Jacks” starred himself and Karl Malden. The two had worked together in “A Streetcar Named Desire,” which earned Malden an Academy Award, and “On the Waterfront,” which earned one for Brando.

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Thursday 10/03/2019
NYSCI takes Legos to the limits of imagination
Updated: October 10, 2019 - 12:07 pm

Legos were always meant to be a toy that encouraged imagination.

In the hands of artist Nathan Sawaya, they are transformed into studies and expressions of art, science, history, philosophy and the endless bounds of imagination.

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Master of the French horn blows into Flushing
Posted: October 03, 2019

He’s played with the best of them, from Frank Sinatra and Judy Garland to Maria Callas and Luciano Pavarotti.

And now, Frank Donaruma is bringing his French horn to a concert at Flushing Town Hall, for one performance only, on Oct. 13 at 5 p.m. And, to top it all, it’s free, with no reservations necessary.

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Empathy and compassion, in light of a massacre
Posted: October 03, 2019

Thalia Spanish Theatre in Sunnyside continues to be an invaluable cultural presence in the borough with its latest offering, “La Golondrina,” a two-character play running through Oct. 13.

As the only bilingual Hispanic theater in Queens, Thalia has been celebrating the diversity of Spanish and Latin American heritage for more than four decades.

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Thursday 09/26/2019
Bayside gets heavy and deep on ‘Interrobang’
Updated: October 03, 2019 - 12:25 pm

Music can often change how a person feels or sees the world — a fact Bayside frontman Anthony Raneri knows well. A musician, he adds, has a responsibility to use the power he has to be inside someone’s head and shape the listener’s outlook on all aspects of life — from love to coping with childhood difficulties.

For Raneri, he perhaps has not used that power in the best way over the past few years. “I was making music for sad people, and it would just make them even sadder,” he said in a recent interview.

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Dazzling detail and realism in a world of beads
Updated: September 26, 2019 - 12:56 pm

Now you see it, now you see it differently.

Resting atop a windowsill at the Voelker Orth house museum in Flushing, my favorite sugar-coated old-fashioned licorice candy, Allsorts, beckons from inside a large glass contemporary apothecary jar, a tumbled array of cut licorice circles and chunks coated with candy dots. As I mention to a woman working at the exhibit there how much I remember loving it as a child, she smiles. Turns out the “candy” is part of the art exhibit!

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Groundbreaking ‘Rent,’ up close and personal
Updated: September 27, 2019 - 12:39 pm

Step inside Long Island City’s Secret Theatre between now and Oct. 6 and you will find yourself completely immersed in the world of Jonathan Larson’s “Rent,” the groundbreaking musical that depicts life in New York City in the early 1990s, when many of the city’s denizens were struggling for their very survival.

Although director Lauren Elder, in a note in the program, describes the show as “a period piece,” in many ways it remains as relevant today as it was when it originally burst upon the theatrical scene nearly a quarter of a century ago.

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Thursday 09/19/2019
Artist crafts a serene world, with some surprises
Updated: September 26, 2019 - 11:59 am

The imagination of artist Chris Bogia can be found in between these days.

Bogia says he was aiming, as he tends to do in his practice, at a place in between the decorative arts and fine arts when creating his pieces for “Under the Bonsai Tree.” The exhibit is showing now through Nov. 2 at the approximately two-year-old Mrs., an independent contemporary art gallery in Maspeth. He was also seeking relief from the anxiety of the American political and social scene.

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Works go deep into Korean-American experiences
Posted: September 19, 2019

Without knowing the artists are Korean-American immigrants, the observer tries to find a common theme to each of the eclectic mix of artwork in the “Threads and Pigments” that opened on Sept. 13 at Flushing Town Hall. Threads and patchworked materials seem to emerge, sidetracked by a few paintings of landscapes and oceans, and huge three-dimensional structures mounted on a wall. But they are all expressions of the artists’ past lives in Korea and their present experiences in America.

Artist Dong Kyu Kim’s clever patchwork of faded receipts in “Shape of Memories #3” is an expression of his desire to record his every consumer purchase in America as a way to contrast the poverty he endured living in his hometown in Korea. A fashion designer of young men’s clothing, Kim also saw his observances of the demise of brick-and-mortar businesses inspire him to create “Everything Must Go,” a patchwork of Fed Ex and USPS packaging used to ship goods.

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Mystery author coming to Maspeth Library
Posted: September 19, 2019

Muriel Adams has given up on love but falls for Marty Benning, a hotshot certified public accountant who has been charged with murdering a rival.

That is the plot of Dina Santorelli’s new mystery, “In the Red,” which follows the police investigation, media coverage and eventual fallout of the situation.

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Thursday 09/12/2019
Make that Forest Hills Sound Gardens
Updated: September 19, 2019 - 11:57 am

It’s two weeks before the big day, the opening performance in this season’s Twilight Concert Series by the Con Brio Ensemble.

The quartet that will be playing together at The Church-In-The-Gardens in Forest Hills on Sept. 22 is gathered at the home of the ensemble’s co-founder, Diana Mittler-Battipaglia, for an afternoon rehearsal. Their shoes are off, they’re seated comfortably around the piano, respective instruments at hand, and they’re ready to escape into their musical world.

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Museum show celebrates civic stewardship
Posted: September 12, 2019

What does community stewardship look like throughout the five boroughs?

That question is the focus of a new Queens Museum exhibit, “Who Takes Care of New York?,” that uses performance art, static art and maps to look at the role civic groups play. It was set up by the Pratt Institute’s Spatial Analysis and Visualization Initiative, independent curator Christina Freeman and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service’s New York City Urban Field Station.

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Museums are getting a day to call their own
Posted: September 12, 2019

Hospitality is coming to a museum near you.

Not that museums aren’t friendly already. But some can be a little intimidating — and others downright expensive.

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Thursday 09/05/2019
Nature’s amateur sleuths want you to join them
Updated: September 12, 2019 - 1:02 pm

Michael Faraday taught himself physics and chemistry while working a day job as a bookseller’s assistant, and ultimately made some of the most consequential scientific discoveries ever, allowing humans to put electricity to practical use. No Faraday, no smartphone.

It’s not too late for you. Aspiring citizen scientists can join Alley Pond Environmental Center’s Adult Citizen Science Club, which is looking for more participants and is open to all, aged 18 and up.

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Rock legend chats before Forest Hills Stadium show
Posted: September 05, 2019

Jethro Tull lead vocalist and flautist Ian Anderson hopes his upcoming show at Forest Hills Stadium is a better experience than the band’s 1976 concert at Shea Stadium.

Anderson, who was featured with guitarists Robin Trower and Rory Gallagher that day, remembers the constant barrage of planes from LaGuardia interrupting with noise. And he was playing in the middle of the field, which was a long way from the fans to begin with.

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Having a ‘Mad, Mad’ time at MoMI in 70mm
Posted: September 05, 2019

Lots of movies have chase scenes; Stanley Kramer’s classic 1963 comedy “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World” is a chase scene — of three hours, complete with the original intermission — that will show this coming Saturday and Sunday as part of the Museum of the Moving Image’s annual “See it Big!” 70mm film festival.

Kramer’s chase begins with a high-speed car pursuit coming to an unfortunate end in the California desert, with a dying Jimmy Durante telling comedy legends Sid Caesar, Jonathan Winters, Milton Berle, Buddy Hackett and Mickey Rooney about a buried fortune he stole 15 years earlier.

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Thursday 08/29/2019
For truly local veggies, hit Socrates on a Saturday
Updated: September 05, 2019 - 12:24 pm

Unless you’re growing your vegetables yourself, you’d be hard-pressed to get them from a more local source than Hellgate Farm. Based in Astoria and Long Island City, the group offers its produce — along with fruit, honey, ketchup and four different hot sauces to spice things up with — every Saturday at Socrates Sculpture Park’s farmers market.

“It’s a perfect niche for us,” said Hellgate Farm founder Rob McGrath. “We do all small-scale farming, we do rooftop farming.”

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Jack Eichenbaum and a lesson on Jewish history
Posted: August 29, 2019

“Home, where my thought’s escaping/Home, where my music’s playing.” The chorus of Simon and Garfunkel’s “Homeward Bound” will be one of the first things attendees of the Queens Historical Society’s Sept. 8 lecture on the Jewish heritage of Queens will hear.

The use of the song is fitting for a number of reasons. Firstly, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are perhaps two of the most famous Jews to call the World’s Borough their birthplace. It also describes the life story of the event’s lecturer, Queens Borough Historian Jack Eichenbaum.

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Enter the dreamy, Caribbean world of Balún
Updated: September 06, 2019 - 5:17 pm

“Our music comes from a place of joy and friendship and fun,” singer, songwriter and accordionist AngÈlica Negron said of her band, Bal˙n. But as with any artist, the group also goes deeper, with “layered and more complicated” themes and messages.

In Bal˙n’s case, those mostly have to do with the members’ homeland, Puerto Rico, which is under pressure from both environmental threats and political drama, and the tug it exerts on members of the diaspora, such as Negron and her husband and bandmate, JosÈ Olivares, who live in Brooklyn.

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