Robert Moog’s love was ‘synthesized’ in Flushing 1

The childhood home of Robert Moog at 51-09 Parsons Blvd. in Flushing, as it looked in the 1940s when he was boy.

George Conrad Moog was born in Brooklyn on Nov. 10, 1904. After graduating college, he entered the National Guard in April 1926 and was honorably discharged in May 1929. Back in Brooklyn, he met and fell in love with Shirleigh Jacobs. They married in September 1930 in Brooklyn. She gave birth to a baby boy, Robert Arthur Moog, on May 23, 1934.

George worked as an electrical engineer for Con Edison in Queens and moved his family to a brand-new 1,475 square-foot Cape Cod style bungalow at 51-09 Parsons Blvd. in Flushing in 1936.

In the 1940s, the electronic hobbyist craze was in full swing. Robert was into it. He earned a degree in physics from Queens College, a master’s in engineering from Columbia and a Ph.D. in engineering from Cornell. A pioneer in electronic music, the Moog Synthesizer was launched in 1964 at a cost of $10,000, as most were bought by record company labels to create soundtracks. In 1967, his synthesizer was discovered by groups like The Doors, The Monkees, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones.

The name Moog became so associated with electronic music, it is sometimes used as generic term. Moog passed away in August 2005 but his influence on the world of music is not forgotten.

His childhood home looks pretty much untouched from its original condition and is appraised at slightly a little over $1 million today.

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