Stories from Astoria, Long Island City, Jackson Heights, Sunnyside, Woodside, Corona, Elmhurst and East Elmhurst

The proposed Kew Gardens parking garage could be the first in New York City to be certified for its sustainability.

Project architects revealed the goal of achieving Parksmart-certified status to the Queens Borough Board at its May 10 meeting. Parksmart is the world’s only certification program that defines, measures and recognizes high-performing, sustainable garages. Only two buildings in the state have been awarded the certification, both of which are in Ithaca. Read more

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In the universe of bike retail, there have been two constants over the past year: resounding interest and stifled inventory.

Following national trends, short bike supply has thrown a wrench into the potential boom for shops around the borough even as New Yorkers have flocked to cycling under the pandemic for recreation and commuting. Read more

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As part of its annual Streets Week! agenda, a set of transit, traffic safety and open space policy announcements, the de Blasio administration committed to reducing the speed limit along 45 miles of streets in 11 locations in the outer boroughs Monday.

Department of Transportation officials said that they targeted roadways with the highest rates of crashes in the city. Read more

Thursday, May 13, 2021

The Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee for Operating Engineers, Local Union #15, will conduct a recruitment from May 31 through June 11, for five operating engineer, or heavy equipment, apprentices for the New York City and Long Island regions.

A form will be available online at local15recruitment.org, Monday through Friday, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. to enter a lottery drawing to receive an application. Only one form can be submitted per person. Applicants who do not have access to a computer should visit a library. Read more

The Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee for Ironworkers, Local Union #40 & #361, is conducting a recruitment period through May 19 for 100 outside ironworker apprentices in the Long Island and New York City regions.

Applications must be obtained and submitted online at nycironworkers.org, no later than 3 p.m. on May 19, 2021. Applicants who do not have access to a computer should visit their local library. Read more

Gov. Cuomo announced Monday that State University of New York and City University of New York campuses will require proof of vaccination for students attending in-person classes starting in the fall semester.

“Let’s make a global statement that you cannot go back to school in-person in September unless you have a vaccine. That will be a major motivation to get the vaccine. And if you have to get a vaccine, why would you wait until September, why wouldn’t you get it now?” Cuomo said during a press conference. Read more

The state Senate took a major step in halting the New York puppy mill pipeline last week.

The chamber passed legislation May 5 that would prohibit the sale of dogs, cats and rabbits in retail pet stores. It would also authorize collaboration with entities to provide space to showcase cats or dogs owned by certain entities for the purpose of adoption. Read more

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As part of its annual Streets Week! agenda, a set of transit, traffic safety and open space policy announcements, the de Blasio administration committed to reducing the speed limit along 45 miles of streets in 11 locations in the outer boroughs Monday.

Department of Transportation officials said that they targeted roadways with the highest rates of crashes in the city. Read more

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On Tuesday, 66,516 fifth-grade students began receiving middle school admission offers for the year ahead after the city tested out a process that Mayor de Blasio altered back in December.

Though the total number of applicants dropped from nearly 71,000 last year, reflecting a more general decline in enrollment across the school system, the results also helped the city reach a larger number of economically disadvantaged students from years past. Read more

Data from a Kaiser Family Foundation report issued last week found that fewer than one-third of parents are likely to get their children vaccinated if eligible.

The report comes days before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Pfizer Covid-19 vaccinations for preteens and younger teens age 12 to 15 on May 10. Read more

The proposed Kew Gardens parking garage could be the first in New York City to be certified for its sustainability.

Project architects revealed the goal of achieving Parksmart-certified status to the Queens Borough Board at its May 10 meeting. Parksmart is the world’s only certification program that defines, measures and recognizes high-performing, sustainable garages. Only two buildings in the state have been awarded the certification, both of which are in Ithaca. Read more

  • Updated

In the universe of bike retail, there have been two constants over the past year: resounding interest and stifled inventory.

Following national trends, short bike supply has thrown a wrench into the potential boom for shops around the borough even as New Yorkers have flocked to cycling under the pandemic for recreation and commuting. Read more

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Last week, Gov. Cuomo signed legislation that would extend the eviction moratorium until Aug. 31, but city landlord lobbyists are trying to halt the measure.

The Rent Stabilization Association and the Community Housing Improvement Program, which collectively represent about 30,000 landlords throughout the city, joined other property owners in filing the federal lawsuit May 6, just two days after Cuomo extended the moratorium three months from the original May 1 expiration. Read more

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Months of organizing by essential workers, labor leaders and workers rights activists have led to the New York HERO Act being signed into law by Gov. Cuomo last week.

The bill sponsored by Senate Deputy Majority Leader Michael Gianaris (D-Astoria) and Assemblywoman Karines Reyes (D-Bronx) requires businesses to have enforceable safety standards to prevent the further spread of the coronavirus and other airborne diseases. Read more

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People on parole are steps closer to having their voting rights restored after Gov. Cuomo signed a bill that will automatically reinstate that privilege for those who were formerly incarcerated of a felony on Wednesday.

The bill is sponsored by Assemblyman Danny O’Donnell (D-Manhattan) and state Sen. Leroy Comrie (D-St. Albans) and has been languishing in the state Legislature for approximately a decade. Read more

Thursday, May 06, 2021
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After years of scrutiny over the disproportionately small number of Black and Latino students who gained admission into New York City’s acclaimed specialized high schools, that number dropped even lower for the coming year.

This year, 23,528 eighth-graders took the Specialized High School Admissions Test, with a total of 4,262 receiving an offer to one of the eight schools based on their exam scores. Black and Latino students were only offered 9 percent of spots in specialized high schools for the 2021-22 school year despite making up about 70 percent of the school population. That admission figure is down from 11 percent the year before, and 10.5 percent in 2019, according to education department data released Thursday. Read more

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As a battle over Queens votes amps up between mayoral hopefuls Eric Adams and Ray McGuire, Adams has declared himself “the Queens candidate.”

Shortly after a March McGuire endorsement by U.S. Rep. Greg Meeks (D-Queens), the chairman of the Queens Democratic Party and congressman for the predominantly Black, highly engaged Southeast Queens electorate, Adams began rolling out his own Queens strategy. Read more