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Queens Chronicle

Worlds Fair 1964

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Readers tell us their memories of the World's Fair

This is the last in a series of 10 stories commemorating the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows. This time we let our readers tell their remembrances.“I must have gone every week. We lived so close. My favorite was and still is ‘It’s a Small World.’ I used to sing the song all the time to tease my niece and nephew because I can’t carry a tune.” — Jeanette Foletar, Middle Village.

Wednesday 06/18/2014
Snapshots of a World’s Fair to remember
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:39 am

1964-65 World’s Fair left a lasting impression on all who attended. Chronicle readers submit their photos from 50 years ago

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Thursday 06/12/2014
Legacies abound from World’s Fair
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 11:23 am

Jet packs, Corfam and disposable dishes versus color television, computers and the Mustang. Did prognosticators at the 1964 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows get it right?

The answer is inevitably, yes and no, but based on long-term success, many of the winners introduced at the World’s Fair exceeded expectations and are thriving 50 years later.

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Thursday 06/05/2014
Buried treasure? Only time will tell
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:30 am

The 1964-65 World’s Fair left several clues of its existence but none more tantalizing than the Westinghouse time capsule and the enigmatic Underground World Home.

Filled with everyday items and not to be opened for 5,000 years, the time capsule was buried 50 feet below ground a day before the fair closed on Oct. 16, 1965. There is a granite marker in Flushing Meadows Park showing where both the 1939 and 1965 capsules were buried 50 and 76 years ago. It is located at the former site of the Westinghouse Pavilion, near the New York State Pavilion.

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Thursday 05/29/2014
Future brighter for NY State Pavilion
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:30 am

One of the most highly acclaimed structures of the 1964-65 World’s Fair — the New York State Pavilion — tragically has been allowed to badly deteriorate, but the 50th anniversary of the extravaganza has brought renewed hope that things are about to change.

With the active support of Borough President Melinda Katz, a task force has been created to come up with ideas on how to raise funds to stabilize the pavilion, estimated to cost around $40 million, followed by possible reuse plans for the facility.

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Thursday 05/22/2014
NY Hall of Science was almost in Manhattan
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:30 am

One of the few buildings left from the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows almost never got built.

The New York Hall of Science — now a premier hands-on exhibit space — had a rocky start, with several planners wanting a permanent science museum to be built in Manhattan. If not for the efforts of Mayor Robert Wagner and World’s Fair Corp. President Robert Moses, it may well have been situated in that other borough.

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Thursday 05/15/2014
Wide range of art at ’64 World’s Fair
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:30 am

One focus of the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows was art. Fairgoers could see paintings by Goya and Michelangelo’s famous “Pieta.” But a few of the artworks specifically designed for the fair were controversial, and some of them remain there today.

Five sculptors were commissioned to create works that would stay in the park after the fair ended. They were Theodore Roszak, Paul Manship, Marshall Fredericks, Jose de Rivera and Donald De Lue.

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Thursday 05/08/2014
NYC Panorama was a big part of fair
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:30 am

World’s Fairs have always been transitory things. Cities were lucky if they retained one or two icons. But at Flushing Meadows, not only are there some pavilions that still exist, but also a feature from the 1964-65 event that is almost as popular today as it was 50 years ago.

The Panorama of the City of New York remains inside the Queens Museum, which in 1939 and 1964 was the New York City Building. The exhibit was the brainchild of Robert Moses, president of both fairs, who saw the miniature city as a permanent exhibit to be used as a tool for urban planners after the event closed. Though that never happened to any great extent, its star power remains for school-age students as well as adults visiting the recently enlarged museum.

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Thursday 05/01/2014
Memorabilia and more at museum
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:30 am

The Queens Museum, which started out as the New York City Pavilion during the 1939 World’s Fair, is the only remaining building left at Flushing Meadows from that time. It is also the major repository of souvenirs and memorabilia from the 1964 extravaganza.

If you like tchotches and souvenirs, this is the place for you. The museum now has on view 900 three-dimensional pieces arranged by date. There are sections for both the 1964 and 1939 fairs.

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Thursday 04/24/2014
There’s plenty left from World’s Fair
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:28 am

On the surface, there appear to be only a few relics left from the 1964-65 World’s Fair at Flushing Meadows, but look a little deeper and there is quite a bit more — if you know where to search.

The 12-story-high Unisphere and neglected New York State Pavilion are the two most visible reminders of the fair, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this month. Part of that pavilion was the circular Theaterama, which several years ago was transformed as the Queens Theatre.

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Thursday 04/17/2014
Fifty years ago a fair opened in Queens
Updated: June 19, 2014 - 3:26 am

It was 1964, the height of the Cold War and Americans were still reeling from the loss of their young president a year earlier. The perfect antidote was a World’s Fair.

Although not a financial success, the two-year event at Flushing Meadows buoyed spirits in a time when that was much needed.

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