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Queens Chronicle

5 foods for better moods, and 5 more that only bring you down

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Posted: Thursday, August 21, 2014 1:00 am | Updated: 4:32 am, Thu Aug 28, 2014.

(BPT) - Did you know the food you eat can literally make you feel happy or sad? Nutrition is one of the main components of mental health, so it’s important to stock your plate with good food while cutting some of those less beneficial alternatives.

“Food can definitely alter your mood,” says Dr. Shoshana Bennett, clinical psychologist, mental health expert, and radio host. “Sometimes the effect is immediate, other times there’s a delay of an hour or so. Over time, the wrong foods can create a continuous foul mood or negative state of mind. Many people still aren't making the connection between their emotional well-being and what they ate for dinner - or the last 200 dinners.” 

Bennett explains that certain foods can negatively affect the neurotransmitters in our brains; these chemicals control sleep, appetite, mood and more. Bad foods can also cause inflammation, which may lead to other physical and mental disorders. She recommends eating these five types of food to feel happy, healthy and balanced:

1. Complex carbohydrates

Foods like beans, potatoes and whole grains are necessary for staying upbeat, as the complex carbohydrates they contain help the brain make serotonin, a mood-changing chemical. Without enough complex carbohydrates, a person can become angry and depressed. 

“The amino acid tryptophan is important for the formation of serotonin,” says Bennett. “Complex carbohydrates help tryptophan cross the blood/brain barrier, thereby increasing the amount of tryptophan in the brain.”

 2. Cold-water fish

Salmon, mackerel and sardines are high in the omega-3s that help boost mood. Several studies show that a deficit in omega-3 fatty acids is linked to anxiety and depression. Most people in the U.S. don't eat enough fresh, cold-water fish, so supplements are required. 

“It's important to use omega-3 supplements of pure quality,” says Bennett. “This means knowing where the fish comes from and how the supplements are manufactured. Nordic Naturals exceeds the highest standards of quality and produces the only omega-3 supplements I put in my body.” 

3.  Selenium

“Research shows people with low levels of the mineral selenium have poorer moods, including the tendency toward depression,” Bennett says.

Foods rich in selenium include shellfish, tuna, nuts, seeds, fish, pork, chicken and pasta. Bennett cautions that too much of this mineral is not healthy either, and recommends checking with a health care practitioner for guidance before taking selenium as a supplement.

4. Folic acid

A diet too low in folic acids can deplete serotonin. Research suggests that depression can be relieved by taking folate supplements or eating more food containing folate, such as spinach, lentils, garbanzo and other beans, romaine lettuce and broccoli.

“Folate is water-soluble, so your body does not store it,” says Bennett. “You need to eat foods regularly that contain it.”

5.  Vitamin D

Vitamin D-rich foods like eggs, milk, cheese and fatty fish (like tuna) help to activate serotonin. Furthermore, research shows a strong connection between low levels of vitamin D and symptoms of depression.

“It hasn’t yet been demonstrated clearly whether low vitamin D levels cause the depression or are a result of depression,” says Bennett. “Either way, consider a blood test to check your vitamin D levels.”

Knowing what foods to skip is just as important as knowing which foods to eat, so Bennett recommends cutting down on these “bad-mood foods”:

1. Sugar

Eating sugar provides a rush of energy, but soon afterward, blood glucose levels drop and lead to low mood and short-temperedness.

2. Sweeteners

Aspartame and other sweeteners can cause depression and insomnia since they block the production of serotonin. If you want a sweetener but are trying to avoid sugar, use stevia or xylitol instead.

3.  Processed carbs

Snack foods, white bread, most cereals and pasta contain processed carbs that negatively affect blood sugar levels the same way as sugar. 

4. Hydrogenated oils

Trans fats are physically and mentally dangerous because they can contribute to depression and other illnesses. 

5. Sodium

High sodium can negatively affect the neurological system and contribute to depression and fatigue.

“You don't have to make major changes all at once,” says Bennett. “It's often more beneficial if one small, realistic alteration is made at a time. Once you experience the payoff - not just read or hear about them - then it becomes fun!”

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